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Category Archives: Codec Related

Here you will find articles and videos helpful concerning Codecs and the optimum settings for using them!

CamStudio (and more!) Mind Map

Here is a mind-map I originally researched and created thinking to sell a course on using CamStudio. But soon afterwards, I became the “help desk guy” for this cool, open-source (FREE) software, and although the Open-Source credo allows selling support materials, I just didn’t feel right. So, I started this site, and then produced the CamStudio tutorial video series you see on YouTube today, and several of the videos there now have surpassed 10,000 views! Continue Reading…

PCM or Microsoft ADPCM?
Which is the Best Audio for Screencasting?

Which is better? PCM or Microsoft ADPCM ?

Well, that all depends on your processor speed and memory, and what kind of audio quality you deem important, among other things! Here is the “whole truth” concerning both!

PCM (which stands for “Pulse Code Modulation”) is GENERALLY SPEAKING the same as 16-bit “CD” audio (as most people use it, though it is available in 8-bit format as well – see below), and it is the standard, having no compression at all – every snapshot, from silence to the loudest waveform burst, is represented by a full 16-bit “word”. It will exhibit the highest audio-portion file size. It records audio into the .wav format into a linear stream of samples. Continue Reading…


Best Color Depth?
16-Bit Color Vs. 32-Bit Color Explained!

Use 16 bit color for screen recording and that will bring the file size down quite a bit. It also will allow your computer to work more efficiently! But let me explain first what “32-bit color” vs. “16-bit color” (and 24-bit color) really means! Then you may make your decision based upon what’s “really going on” under the hood!

16-bit video usually uses 5 bits (32 brightness levels) for red, 6 bits (64 brightness levels) for green (because our eye is more sensitive to green), and 5 bits again (32 brightness levels) for blue. So, 32 X 64 X 32 equals the famous “65,536 colors” you often hear about. Some Macs use 5 bits for each (for 32 X 32 X 32 = 32768 colors) and then uses 1 bit for an alpha channel. You most likely use the first type, however.

“32-bit color” is actually 24 bit color, plus an extra 8 bits for an “alpha” channel. Thus, 32-bit color is using 8 bits (256 brightness levels) for red, 8 bits (256 brightness levels) for blue and also 8 bits (256 brightness levels) for green’s brightness and 8 bits for the alpha channel, so it is actually 24-bit color with the added 8-bit alpha channel included. I understand that some video card’s transparency effects are dependent upon the 32 bit mode, Continue Reading…